Tagged: Economics

It takes a Village to get an iPhone battery replacement

Miniature horse in Apple Store.

This has nothing to do with my iPhone battery replacement, but here’s a miniature horse in the University Village Apple Store in Seattle back in 2009 — before it got too crowded for people, much less horses.

I got a new $29 battery for my iPhone yesterday, not just because I could (funny story about replacements) but because I had to. My iPhone had stopped holding a charge for longer than about six hours. I’m going to walk you through my replacement experience because you might find it informative. Also, I’m long overdue in writing an annual blog post, which means there will be a long <digression> for those of you who do not own an iPhone.

You have until the end of the year to take advantage of Apple’s offer, but it might be a good idea to act well before that, as you will see. It’s not quite as simple showing up at the Genius Bar.

My iPhone 7 was purchased in November 2016, so I’d had it for 17 months — the warranty had expired. A couple of weeks ago, the battery started depleting rapidly and I was getting 20 percent warnings that I had never seen before.

So I went to the Apple website. Among the options for battery replacement, I chose to make a Genius Bar appointment. But when I did, it showed me a small number of available times a week hence, and none of them worked for me. So I called the general support number. Turns out you need to order the battery first, and they let you know when it arrives at the nearest store. Then you leave it with them for 90 minutes while they make the change. But the woman on the phone told me it could take two to five weeks for the battery to arrive at the store. OK, I figured, I guess I’ll limp along until it arrives and be thankful I didn’t wait until the end of the year when everyone else will be trying to get their $29 batteries.

As it happened, the Apple Store called the next day and said they had the battery and I could make an appointment to get it installed. Talk about under-promising and over-delivering. I picked Saturday at 3 p.m. Continue reading

Another media titan sells the dirt underfoot

When South Lake Union is too expensive for the top TV station in town, that’s a sign — of the demise of local TV, which is the next medium to begin a rapid economic descent, after radio and newspapers.

TV stations used to be all about visibility and ostentation — the tower with Christmas lights, the unique building, the talent, the helicopter, the branding, the logo-laden vehicles, the live shot, the reporter or anchor sent to a faraway disaster for no good reason but to preen. (Remember the KIRO news jet?)

But now cable and the Internet are killing them, too. Viewership of local TV news is flat or down. Meanwhile, the population increases steadily.

As it was with newspapers, the first thing to go is the valuable real estate. In five or 10 years, we’ll probably have one station doing news and perhaps sharing that. KING and KOMO already are sharing a helicopter. KOMO’s former parent sold Fisher Plaza. KCPQ and KIRO will be next to sell their dirt in the former media gulch.

It’s the end of an era.